Reading Goals

So, I have been generally absent from posting here recently, other than the odd reblog. I have been pretty distracted of late, rather euphoric, and have been ignoring the blog almost entirely. My reading has also been rather slow, but I thought that I would return to the way of the blog, with a general update as to my current progress and goals.

I am still stuck on the three books I have been reading for a while, but intend to make some progress today, if possible. So currently trying to finish Homer’s ‘The Odyssey’, Zola’s ‘The Fortune of the Rougons’ and Stephen King’s ‘Joyland’. With  a bit of luck I will actually finish Homer this weekend and then be able to concentrate on the others during the week.

So what is next, you may ask? Probably you won’t, but I shall tell you anyway. I want to start on the next book in  Zola’s ‘Rougon-Macquart’ cycle, which in order of publishing, which is kind of the order that I am going to read these in is ‘The Kill’. As to other books, I am intending to take a look at the sonnets of Edna St Vincent Millay that have been recommended to me, and I am looking forward to experiencing.

So there it is. My altogether inadequate reading goals for the next few weeks.

70 thoughts on “Reading Goals

  1. If finishing the Odessy and reading sonnets is an inadequate goal, I don’t know what that says about my own reading habits!

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    • Yeh, you obviously haven’t checked the high brow things like ‘How I Created my Perfect Prom Date’ on my Goodreads banner. Read what you enjoy, there are no rules. Goals are personal.

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      • It’s probably on a par with box wine, truly. I enjoyed it. I will read almost anything, I admit. There’s usually something good in any book, even if in some cases it is a single thought or sentence.

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      • Good mentality. I think I’ve only given up on one book because they had a made-up language and I had to keep going back to the pronunciation guide every few paragraphs. Unless we count high school and then I’m terrible.

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      • I imagine that could get a bit tedious, so I would probably agree in that situation. I did give up on ‘Return of the Native’ by Thomas Hardy, but will try again soon, since I have read others by him since and enjoyed them.

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      • My most epic quit is ‘The Pearl’ by John Steinbeck. I was in 8th grade and I couldn’t do it. Two pages about a brick wall and I wanted out. I might have still been angry at John for what he did in ‘The Red Pony’ and the teacher made the mistake of telling us that ‘Treasure Island’ was next.

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      • Never read ‘The Grapes of Wrath’. A lot of the classics I read were school assignments. For fun, I stuck with the fantasy and sci-fi. Lord of the Rings, Jurassic Park (that one got me in trouble), etc.

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      • I like fantasy for fun too. Especially Eddings and Feist. Obviously I enjoy the classics too, but you have to read them in a different way, I think. More considered maybe.

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      • I don’t know how it works over there, but they really push the classics on us in school here. I think that’s created a lot of people that refuse to read any more of them. It reminds people of homework and tests.

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      • That’s a good point. When I was at school we had to do for final exams a Shakespeare, a Dickens, something modern and another book. Sometimes they are foisted on people at too early an age, spoiling their potential enjoyment for the future.

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      • I read my first Shakespeare in 6th grade, which was age 11-12. Romeo & Juliet, which I hated. The next year we acted out Julius Caesar and I loved it. I think it’s very much in the delivery. Dickens was only ‘Christmas Carol’ and ‘Great Expectations’. Both fun.

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      • We did ‘Romeo and Juliet’ and ‘Oliver Twist’, but I had read ‘Hard Times’ and ‘Macbeth’ myself also for interest. I love ‘Romeo and Juliet’. The delivery can certainly be a big part of it though, you are right.

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      • I never got to read ‘Macbeth’. We did ‘Othello’ in 12th grade and I took a Shakespeare course in college where I only remember ‘A Midsummer’s Night Dream’. Still not sure how I passed that class. I think it was more analysis than reading.

        The method my teacher used for ‘Julius Caesar’ was everyone had a role. He took the most obnoxious student and made him Caesar. The kid was happy until the teacher pointed out that his fellow classmates get to pretend to stab him. It was a lot of fun.

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      • The look on his face was priceless. He had to stay ‘dead’ on the table for the rest of the scene and whenever they needed the ‘body’. We’d lean on him and sit near his head because his grade depended on him not moving or speaking.

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  2. You said Eddings Julian. I definitely love you. No one ever says Eddings. They all say Jordan or Salvatore or Brooks. David Eddings does not get enough love in my opinion.

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